How are ACOs trying to lower cost?

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Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) aim to use coordinated care to increase quality and lower cost. While everyone likes the sound of integrated care, it may be less clear how ACOs are aiming to achieve these goals. In a recent Health Affairs blog post, Micklos and co-authors review one study found that: …Next Gen ACO participants […]

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Friday Links

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Urgent care vs. ED. FDA review of old drugs. R&D incentives and innovation spillovers. Pharmaceuticals and the Developing World. Care managers vs cost centers. Source link […]

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Average cost to bring a drug to market is over $1 billion

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The cost to bring a drug to market is a hotly debated topic. The costs include not only the costs for basic science and clinical trials. However, one must also take into account the cost of capital (since most cost are incurred up front, but revenue begins only after drug approval) and the likelihood of […]

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All about health reimbursement arrangement IRS rules

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At Take Command Health, we’ve been admittedly giddy about the ICHRA  even before it burst onto the scene in January 2020. This version of health reimbursement arrangements represents a “super-charged” version of the QSEHRA (qualified small employer HRA), with higher contribution limits and greater design flexibility. Today, we are all about health reimbursement arrangement IRS […]

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Hybrid Approach to Resolving Payment Disputes Breaks Legislative Stalemates Over Balance Billing, How Will the No Surprises Act Affect These New State Laws?

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Seven states in 2020 were able to break a longstanding stalemate and enact protections against surprise out-of-network billing. CHIR’s Jack Hoadley and Kevin Lucia delve into the factors that got these states across the finish line and how the federal No Surprises Act will impact these states’ new laws. Continue reading → The post Hybrid […]

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Should you risk adjust for social factors?

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If you want to implement value-based care, you need to define what a ‘good’ outcome is. A good outcome may be different for different individuals. For instance, if you look at mortality rates for a given disease, it makes sense that individuals age 80 and above will have higher mortality rates than those 20-29 year […]

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